Passport To Pimlico

1949

Directed By

Henry Cornelius

Synopsis

A whimsical tale of a British evasion of authoritarianism, written by celebrated Ealing regular and Academy Award Winner T.E.B. Clarke (The Lavender Hill Mob, Barnacle Bill) and produced by the revered Michael Balcon, Passport to Pimlico is a daring, charming, timeless classic from the Golden Age of the Ealing Comedies.

When an unexploded WWII bomb is accidentally detonated in Pimlico, Arthur Pemberton (Stanley Holloway, My Fair Lady, The Lavender Hill Mob) and daughter Shirley (Barbara Murray, Some Will, Some Won’t) investigate the crater made by the explosion and discover a treasure trove including documents proving that the region is in fact part of Burgundy, France and therefore foreign territory. The residents are quick to act and take the opportunity to escape from post World War II austerity, tear up their ration books and break from English rule. However complications and comedic chaos ensues as the British Government attempt to regain control as a beleaguered Burgandy fight back.

Academy Award nominated for Best Screenplay and nominated by BAFTA for Best British Film, sit back and enjoy a hysterical expression of fantasy rebellion and adventure in the little local town of Pimlico.

Cast
Stanley Holloway, Hermione Baddeley, Margaret Rutherford, Paul Dupuis, Barbara Murray
Other Credits

Written By T.E.B Clarke

Release Date
11 June 2012
extras
  • New Interview with Mark Duguid
  • New Locations featurette with Richard Dacre
  • Behind the scenes stills gallery
  • Restoration comparison
  • Trailer
  • English SDH
Restoration Details

PASSPORT TO PIMLICO restoration was completed at Pinewood Studios in high definition using the best original film materials available. After rigorous assessment, the best material for restoration, which was used was the fine-grain inter-positive and scanned in 2k definition. Over 40 hours were spent to ensure a thorough clean up was performed removing dirt, scratches, warps, tears or replacing torn or missing frames and improving stability issues for the digital restoration, ensuring the general look of the film does not stray too far from the original release, particularly with reference to the day for night scenes.

Pressbook

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